Ka Malu Halau a Ola

"The Center"

About

Ka Malu Halau a Ola (aka “the Center”) is being conceived as a culturally oriented, community-based Health and Wellness Center to serve the North Shore of Kauai. It will serve both Native Hawaiians as well as non-Hawaiian residents of the community. 

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Drug and Alcohol Addiction Program

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Wellness and Community Resource Programs

Purpose of the center

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The Center’s mission is to serve as a culturally oriented, community-based Health and Wellness Center for the residents of Kauai’s North Shore, extending from Kīlauea to Hāʻena. This will encompass the communities of Kīlauea, Kalihiwai, Anini, Princeville, Hanalei, Waipā, Lumahaʻi, Wainiha, and Hāʻena.

The Center’s target population is the North Shore community of children, adolescents, adults, and elderly residents with a focus on youth (i.e., those under age 18) and the elderly. Adults (age 18-65 years) will provide the bulk of support services to the organization to ensure that our goals and objectives can be met.

Strategy

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He pili kua, He pili alo 

Safe Space

close to the back, close to the front; well protected

A drug and alcohol-free, safe space that is cognizant of emotional, mental, and physical rehabilitation

  • Located on 10 acres

  • Satellite partner sites

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‘A’ohe pau ka ‘ike i ke halau ho’okahi 

Personalized Treatment

All knowledge is not taught in the same school

Structured, multi-faceted, personalized treatment focusing on long-term recovery integrating professional, community, and cultural strategies and resources 
•    Home host small intimate groups
•    24 hr. available help
•    Daily AA/NA program
•    Certified substance abuse counselors
•    Relapse prevention, life skills and education provided in groups and individual sessions
•    XPT program – Breath – Move – Recover
•    Social worker to help with past to present life issues 

Image by Greg Rosenke
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Mohala i ka wai ka maka o ka pua 

Sustainability

Unfolded by the water are the faces of the flowers; People thrive where living conditions are good

•    Invasive species removals
•    Stream monitoring
•    Shoreline monitoring
•    Reef/coral restoration and data collecting
•    Limu restoration
•    Clean water projects
•    Protecting and cleaning sacred mauna
•    Clearing invasive plants in culturally sensitive areas
•    Out planting natives
•    Beach cleanups

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Ho’i ka ‘o’opu ‘ai lehua i ka mapunapuna 

Cultural Grouding

The lehua-eating goby has gone back to the spring; Said of one who has gone back to the source

Cultural grounding – Collective consciousness – Contribution – Service
•    Taro Farming
•    Protocol workshops
•    Hawaiian language classes
•    Genealogy workshops
•    Wahi pana/Moolelo workshops

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Mai ka uka a ke kai, mai kahi pae a kahi pae (….) he ho’okahi no ‘ohana

Community Engagement

From the upland to the sea, from one end to the other, there is only one family

Community and family engagement and support all-inclusive in the healing journey.
•    Family Counseling
•    Sponsorship 

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North Shore Statistics and Facts

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Demographic Profile

Kauai’s North Shore communities have slightly more than 6,000 residents in the following age/demographic groups:

ZIP Code
Communities
Population

This area, particularly the far North Shore (Hanalei, Waipa, Lumahai, Wainiha, and Ha’ena), is extremely rural and remote. There are few services, other than a grocery, visitor-oriented retail shops and restaurants, and a post office in Hanalei which is four miles from “the end of the road.” The nearest health facility is an urgent care center in Princeville; the closest primary care clinic is in Kilauea, another 6.7 miles down the road from Princeville; and there is one dentist in Hanalei.

The health-related statistics of North Shore communities include:

 

  • High prevalence of diabetes (8.5% on Kauai)

  •  Need for improvement in the areas of exercise, nutrition, and weight management

  • Wellness and Lifestyle deficiencies (e.g., smoking)

  • A growing population of older adults 

  • A persistent substance abuse problem, especially among younger residents

  • For the North Shore Communities: Long distances to travel for health care services, sometimes by bus

  • A disproportionately high rate of suicide among youth age 15-24 years, including:

    • Between 2013 and 2017: 92 per 100,000 residents on Kauai compared to 66 per 100,000 on Oʻahu and 86 on Maui

    • Only the Big Island had a higher rate during this period (117 per 100,000)

 
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Economic Issues

This area, particularly the far North Shore (Hanalei, Waipa, Lumahai, Wainiha, and Ha’ena), is extremely rural and remote. There are few services, other than a grocery, visitor-oriented retail shops and restaurants, and a post office in Hanalei which is four miles from “the end of the road.” The nearest health facility is an urgent care center in Princeville; the closest primary care clinic is in Kilauea, another 6.7 miles down the road from Princeville; and there is one dentist in Hanalei.

The health-related statistics of North Shore communities include:

 

  • High prevalence of diabetes (8.5% on Kauai)

  •  Need for improvement in the areas of exercise, nutrition, and weight management

  • Wellness and Lifestyle deficiencies (e.g., smoking)

  • A growing population of older adults 

  • A persistent substance abuse problem, especially among younger residents

  • For the North Shore Communities: Long distances to travel for health care services, sometimes by bus

  • A disproportionately high rate of suicide among youth age 15-24 years, including:

    • Between 2013 and 2017: 92 per 100,000 residents on Kauai compared to 66 per 100,000 on Oʻahu and 86 on Maui

    • Only the Big Island had a higher rate during this period (117 per 100,000)